Immigration Services
Helping Clients Understand the Various Immigration Processes

Immigration Information

Asylum
United States Citizenship
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
Immigration Court
Family Immigration
Employment Visas

Global Immigration Legal Services
775.549.4333

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United States Citizenship

The United States has a long history of welcoming immigrants from all parts of the world. America values the contributions of immigrants who continue to enrich this country and preserve its legacy as a land of freedom and opportunity.

Deciding to become a U.S. citizen is one of the most important decisions in an individual’s life. If you decide to apply to become a U.S. citizen, you will be showing your commitment to the United States and your loyalty to its Constitution. In return, you are rewarded with all the rights and privileges that are part of U.S. citizenship. (USCIS)

Citizenship is conferred on someone who has been a Legal Permanent Resident for five (5) years, been a person of “good moral character” and is over the age of 18. If a person is under the age of 18, they may become automatically naturalized if they have at least one U.S. citizen parent you need to only wait three (3) years, and the two (2) years “conditional legal permanent residency”. In the event that you obtained your permanent resident status through marriage, you need to only wait the three (3) years. And, the two (2) years “conditional legal permanent residency” counts toward the three (3) years.

The citizenship application includes submitting form N-400 (Application for Naturalization), requisite supporting documents, and you will be asked to be fingerprinted for purposes of a background check. At your interview, you will be given a U.S. Citizenship examination which tests your knowledge of the English language and the U.S. government and history. You must pass this test to be eligible.

Certain applicants have different English and civics testing requirements based on their age and length of lawful permanent residence at the time of submitting their application. If you are over 50 years of age and have lived in the United States as a lawful permanent resident for periods totaling at least 20 years, or if you are 55 years of age and have lived in the United States as a lawful permanent resident for periods totaling at least 15 years, you do not have to take the English test, but you do have to take the civics test in the language of your choice. If you are over 65 years of age and have lived in the United States as a lawful permanent resident for periods totaling at least 20 years, you do not have to take the English test, but you do have to take a simpler version of the civics test in the language of your choice.

After your swearing-in naturalization ceremony, you are provided a certificate of citizenship. You hold the same rights as any other United States citizen. Therefore, you may begin to sponsor other relatives as Legal Permanent Residents. Additionally, you cannot lose your citizenship if you leave the United States for any extended period of time.

We can help prepare the citizenship application and accompany you to your citizenship interview.

When you hire a qualified lawyer, you can reduce the chance that your application will be delayed for errors or omissions or, rejected for misrepresentation. A lawyer can accompany an applicant to his or her citizenship interview and can help set the tone for a successful interview. The lawyer can also address any issues that may arise concerning residency, physical presence, or moral character.